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100 Cities - 100 Memorials

Geolocalisation bp

Memorial Inventory Project:  There is one other existing partial database to consult - The WWI Memorial Inventory Project [CLICK HERE]. It contains some memorials our map doesn't. The listings on this database are fair game for the Memorial Hunters Club. So if you want to search for treasure from your desk - find missing listings here and submit them. Remember though, you will need to come up with pictures and the history of the memorial. You might be able to hunt that down through www.Proquest.com and Google.

 

 

  • Width: 2'
  • 1932
  • Dedication Date: 1932
  • American Legion & Community Citizens
  • Tablet on boulder
  • Other
Sergeant Colyer Square
11420
NY
USA

SERGEANT COLYER SQUARE / DEDICATED TO THE MEMORY OF/ WILBUR E. COLYER SERGEANT CO. A 1ST ENGINEERS, 1ST DIVISION, U.S.A. / --- / KILLED IN ACTION, / OCT. 10, 1918. HILL 269, VERDUN FRANCE. / --- / AWARDED / MEDAL OF HONOR. / ERECTED BY THE WILBUR E. COLYER POST 28, / AMERICAN LEGION, / AND CITIZENS OF THIS COMMUNITY. / 1932 /

  • Dedication Date: November 6, 2005
103 Broad St
36726 Camden
AL
USA
  • Memorial Hunters Club Submission: Terra Schramm
1 E. Edenton Street
27601 Raleigh
NC
USA

The modest granite marker that sits close to Salisbury Street is the smallest memorial on the grounds of the North Carolina State Capitol, but it commemorates the valor of the men of the 81st Division and the role they played in World War I.

Nicknamed the “Wildcat Division” for their reputedly ferocious and unyielding spirit, these soldiers distinguished themselves in the fighting in France, participating in the occupation of the St. Die sector and the offense at Meuse-Argonne. The 81st Division was initially made up of men drafted from North Carolina, South Carolina, and Florida. The first men sent to the division were part of the first draft of September 5, 1917.

The division was organized at Camp Jackson, near Columbia, South Carolina, in September 1917 and went into training. In May 1918 it was sent to Camp Sevier, near Greenville, South Carolina, and in July it was ordered to New York to be shipped overseas. In August the division sailed to England and then to France.

It was initially sent to the trenches in the Vosges Mountains in September where it held what was considered a quiet front, though the division suffered 116 casualties there. On November 6, the division was transferred to the front east of Verdun, on the east side of the Meuse River.

Starting on November 8 the division attacked German positions for two days with limited success. From the outset the 81st Division's troops were met with heavy German machine gun and artillery fire. Rumors reached the 81st Division commanders that an armistice might be signed on November 11, but because no official word was received about a cessation of hostilities, they ordered their men to continue their attacks. At daybreak, November 11, 81st Division soldiers were ordered to assault German positions.

The troops slowly advanced through the heavy fog and German shell and machine gun fire. Then, at 11:00, the firing abruptly stopped. The war was over.

The 81st Division suffered 1,104 casualties--248 killed or dead from wounds and 856 wounded--for the short time it was in combat. Like the 30th Division, the 81st Division remained in France and was not part of the Army of Occupation in Germany. In early June the men were shipped back to the United States and discharged from service. N.C. Highway 20 was called the "Wildcat Highway" in remembrance of these men. Highway 20 ran from the state's western border in Madison County southeast to Wrightsville Beach.

Today this road is known as U.S. Highway 74. The memorial was dedicated on October 5, 1941, by the Wildcat Veterans’ Association to honor the North Carolina men of the 81st Division. The marker was dedicated as “an inspiration from the past and a warning to the future.” 

 

 

  • Memorial Hunters Club Submission: The Wanderer
West D St at Memorial Ave
28659 North Wilkesboro
NC
USA

The Wilkes County Memorial Avenue World War I Monument stands about fourteen feet tall on a sidewalk corner at the intersection of D Street and Ninth Street (Memorial Avenue). This stone marker has a large rectangular base, with an obelisk shape making up the top portion of the monument. The original bronze plaque on the top portion of the monument faces Ninth Street (Memorial Avenue), with a list of fifty-one Wilkes County veterans who gave their lives in World War I. A second plaque was later added in 2000 to the opposite face of the monument, with a corrected list of fifty-five names of Wilkes County World War I veterans.

100 Bacon St.
31042 Irwinton
GA
USA

"In honor of the Citizens of Wilkinson County who served the Military Forces of our county, state and nation from the Revolution War to present and those who may serve in the future”

  • William B. Corbett
  • Most references refer to the park only as Mother's Rest Park. A few call it Mother's Rest/Corbett Park. Some refer to it as Mother's Rest Park, formerly known as Corbett Park.
  • Common or green
  • Memorial Hunters Club Submission: Erik Neider
131 W. Paddock St
60014 Crystal Lake
IL
USA
This plaque was dedicated to honor one of Crystal Lake's noblest sons. William Chandler Peterson died on June 6, 1918, at the battle of Chateau Thierry.
  • Dedication Date: 10/12/1921
  • Flagpole
Centre Street and South Huntington Avenue
Jamaica Plain
MA
USA

Plaque: Dedicated in honor of William E. Canary of the 101st Infantry Division who lost his life in action during World War I at St. Mihiel, France September 12, 1918

  • Other Measurements: Diameter:4'
  • 1980
  • Dedication Date: 1980
  • Flagstaff base, incised letters
  • Other
William F Moore Park
Corona
11368 Corona
NY
USA

WILLIAM F. MOORE MEMORIAL PARK. RECONSTRUCTED AND DEDICATED 1980/
IN MEMORIAM TO OUR BELOVED PRIVATE - USMC 47TH COMPANY, 3RD
BATTALION, 5TH REGIMENT WHO SACRIFICED / HIS LIFE IN COMBAT,
BELLEAU WOODS, FRANCE - JUNE 7, 1918.

  • Memorial Hunters Club Submission: The Wanderer
2000 W. 4th St.
17701 Williamsport
PA
USA

This memorial was sculpted by Giuseppe Moretti and was erected by the citizens of the 7th and 11th wards of the City of Williamsport and Woodward and Old Lycoming Townships. Listed on panels on seven sides of the octagonal stone base are the names of 350 men and women from the area who served in World War I. The inscription reads: 

Erected by
the Citizens
of the Seventh
and Eleventh Wards
of the City of
Williamsport
and Woodard
and Old
Lycoming Townships
in memory of
the Soldiers
Sailors and Nurses
who served
in the World War

400 American Legion Drive
21795 Williamsport
MD
USA

Located inside American Legion Potomac Post 202

  • Memorial Hunters Club Submission: Paul Osman
62693 Williamsville
IL
USA
Williamsville library has a great photo of 33rd (Prairie) Division veterans posed in front of the arch when it was finished in 1919
  • Memorial Hunters Club Submission: The Wanderer
Main St at Brown St
41339 Jackson
KY
USA

The inscription on this marker reads:

Kentucky's only medal of honor winner in World War I. Born at the head of Freeman Fork of Longs Creek, Breathitt County, KY. Jan. 1, 1890. Single handedly destroyed three German machine gun nests. Killed 24 enemy soldiers near Bois De Froges France Sept. 26, 1918. Received medal for heroism July 19, 1919, died Leslie County, KY. age 59, May 29, 1949 of lingering lung infection, the result of inhaling poisonous gas during war. Originally buried in Leslie County. Re-interred in Zachary Taylor National Cemetery, Louisville KY.

  • Dedication Date: 05/23/1937
  • city, state, federal
  • $185,000
  • 4-wall mural in the building by Richard Haines, sponsored by WPA, completed 1938, includeds references to several wars, including WWI. Mural was restored in 1996.
  • City paid for 53,500; state and federal paid the remainder.
  • William M. Ingemann, architect
  • Auditorium/hall/theater

The Willmar Auditorium built by WPA is one of the most handsome auditoriums in Minnesota. It has two stories and a basement. In some sections of the building it has a third story. It was built at a cost of $160,000. The building has a concrete foundation, reinforced concrete slabs, steel roof trusses, and a wood roof. The walls are of brick with stone trim. The sculpture over the entrance was done by the Federal Art Project. The basement accommodates a band room, dressing rooms, showers, and mechanical equipment rooms. On the first floor are the auditorium, stage, and kitchen and war memorial room. The second floor has meeting rooms and a projection room.

PWA Moderne realized primarily through a pattern of contrasting stone
inlaid in the brick walls. Over the entrance are three relief panels in stone depicting the glories of agriculture, government, and transportation.

The Willmar War Memorial Auditorium features engraved stones from each state to honor Minnesota veterans. It was built between 1935 and 1938.

New Hanover County Museum, 814 Market St.
28401 Wilmington
NC
USA

This is a life-size cast metal WWI doughboy wearing a pack and advancing through the stumps and barbed wire of No Man's land. In one hand is a rifle and in the other, a grenade. It was sculpted by E.M. Viquesney and was formerly In the collection of the Wilming­ton Light Infantry.

1803 S. 18th St
18042 Easton
PA
USA

The inscription on this memorial reads: 

"To those who patriotically responded to the call of their country for service in the World War, this memorial erected A.D. 1925 by the Citizens of Wilson Borough, is gratefully dedicated. 1917-1918"

  • Dedication Date: November 11, 1928
  • Ernest Moore Viquesney
  • Single figure -- soldier
47394 Winchester
IN
USA
This monument features one of E. M. Viquesney's "Spirit of the American Doughboy" statues.
Main St. and Mystic Valley Pkwy.
01890 Winchester
MA
USA

This sculpture by Herbert Adams is of two bronze female figures representing Justice and Humanity, standing together in front of an American flag. They hold a wreath, each with one hand. One also holds a laurel branch and the other holds a sword. Beneath them is a rectangular Stony Brook granite base resting on two steps. It was dedicated on October 3, 1926, as a tribute to the Winchester men and women who served in WWI.

  • Width: 2'1
  • Depth: 2'1
  • Other Measurements: Pedestal H:4' W:3'5
  • 1926
  • Dedication Date: 1926
  • Standing female figure (over life-size) on pedestal
  • American Art Foundry
  • James S. J. Novelli
  • Single figure -- soldier
65th Place and Laurel Hill Boulevard
Queens
NY
USA

Shield
DEDICATED 
TO THOSE WHO 
MADE THE 
SUPREME SACRIFICE 
AND TO ALL OTHERS 
FROM WINFIELD 
WHO ENTERED THE 
SERVICE OF OUR 
COUNTRY IN THE 
WORLD WAR 
NEW YORK 
CITY 
AD 
MCMXXVI .

Pedestal
EDWARD J. LANGE 
HENRY C. LOCHMAN 
OTTO MAREK 
JAMES V. PERGOLA 
FREDERICK JACKSON 
RANDOLPH JARDINE 
AUSTIN GREER